IMNZ 2016

Posted by Dylan on 27 April 2016

So it has been a while between drinks.
Sorry about that!
IRONMAN NZ 16:
As gutted as I am after the last two results at Challenge Wanaka and now Ironman NZ, I am starting to see the light. 
I would have said I was in the best shape of my long-distance carrier prior to the ‘double’ this year, physically anyway. 
Mentally I was off the mark and missed a few key things that I should have adapted to fit my ‘new’ physical approach to training and racing.
After Wanaka I was extremely fired up to redeem myself at Ironman NZ. 
I recovered reasonably quickly and felt pretty good over the 2 weeks between events.
I felt as though I was good to go come race day in Taupo.
It was a Stella field in Taupo, probably the best ever and race day dawned with perfect conditions.
One thing I struggled with heading in to Taupo was controlling what I wanted to get out of the race. I wanted to win, which is great of course, but by wanting to win I forgot about the processes that would get me there, about doing the things that work for me and that get me the best outcome on the finish line.
The NZ Army fired their cannon and off we went. I started to the left and had a heap of clear water and was able to settle in and do my own thing. The swim was pretty non-eventful and some 45minutes later I exited the water feeling pretty good.
There was an amazing amount of people lining the carpet up to T2, a real buzz, and I may or may not have run my fastest km out of the water!  
On to the bike and everything was going smoothly. I even managed to get my feet in to my new S-works 6 road shoes without too much difficulty, a real relief I tell you! I was afraid of having to ride 180km on top of them (they are an insanely awesome shoe, but the new fitted design means they need a bit of time to get in to).
After Wanaka and my idiocy on the bike I had decided to be super controlled at the start and build through the ride. It meant watching my power up Napier Hill and keeping it well capped. 
Well capped it was and I was caught at the top by Terenzo and Paul Matthews, two guys I know can ride. We were working well together and I expected to see the group I did at the turn around and for them to be so close. We were pulled in about the 70km mark and ended up amongst the group about 12 strong.
Heading back in to town a few fireworks started to go off. I made a few mistakes during this time and was basically always at the front chasing the guys having a crack. By the 2nd time up Napier hill I was starting to feel it in my legs. For the next 20-30km I was very much a yo yo and was struggling to hold the group. I finally gave in about the 120-130km mark and let the group go. Riding by myself wasn’t that bad and I wasn’t losing too much time, but at the 165km mark I punctured. My pitstop didn’t work and I ended up getting a spare tubular off of another athlete and made the change. Overall I lost about 10minutes and in hindsight it was a bit of a blessing in disguise. 
Getting off the bike I knew my body wasn’t quite right. I felt quite good fatigue wise, but I once again, like Wanaka, had no rhythm and my right hamstring was ‘catching’ on every stride and slowly but surely began to egg away at me.
I saw my coach about the 10km mark and told him the news that this might be my first DNF over this distance. I was out of the race and not doing myself any favours by pushing the hamstring. 
I always prepare for full distance races knowing that I will give everything I have and will never have a ‘plan B.’ This time I had to think about the rest of the year ahead, which made it a little easier to swallow. 
Like I mentioned, had I not punctured I might have been tempted to carry on in the race and fight for a decent place, so again a bit of a blessing in disguise there. 
To the mighty Cam Brown – WOW!
Joe Skipper – what a race, solo all day and just went after it with everything he had.
Callum Millward – gets the race of the day in my book. Aggressive all day and took the race to everyone. His race will come.
Meredith Kessler – Dominated again, amazing racing and consistency. Something to aspire to.

So it has been a while between drinks.

Sorry about that!

 

IRONMAN NZ 16:

As gutted as I am after the last two results at Challenge Wanaka and now Ironman NZ, I am starting to see the light. 

I would have said I was in the best shape of my long-distance carrier prior to the ‘double’ this year, physically anyway. 

Mentally I was off the mark and missed a few key things that I should have adapted to fit my ‘new’ physical approach to training and racing.

 

After Wanaka I was extremely fired up to redeem myself at Ironman NZ. 

I recovered reasonably quickly and felt pretty good over the 2 weeks between events.

I felt as though I was good to go come race day in Taupo.

It was a Stella field in Taupo, probably the best ever and race day dawned with perfect conditions.

One thing I struggled with heading in to Taupo was controlling what I wanted to get out of the race. I wanted to win, which is great of course, but by wanting to win I forgot about the processes that would get me there, about doing the things that work for me and that get me the best outcome on the finish line.

 

The NZ Army fired their cannon and off we went. I started to the left and had a heap of clear water and was able to settle in and do my own thing. The swim was pretty non-eventful and some 45minutes later I exited the water feeling pretty good.

There was an amazing amount of people lining the carpet up to T2, a real buzz, and I may or may not have run my fastest km out of the water!  

 

On to the bike and everything was going smoothly. I even managed to get my feet in to my new S-works 6 road shoes without too much difficulty, a real relief I tell you! I was afraid of having to ride 180km on top of them (they are an insanely awesome shoe, but the new fitted design means they need a bit of time to get in to).

After Wanaka and my idiocy on the bike I had decided to be super controlled at the start and build through the ride. It meant watching my power up Napier Hill and keeping it well capped. 

Well capped it was and I was caught at the top by Terenzo and Paul Matthews, two guys I know can ride. We were working well together and I expected to see the group I did at the turn around and for them to be so close. We were pulled in about the 70km mark and ended up amongst the group about 12 strong.

Heading back in to town a few fireworks started to go off. I made a few mistakes during this time and was basically always at the front chasing the guys having a crack. By the 2nd time up Napier hill I was starting to feel it in my legs. For the next 20-30km I was very much a yo yo and was struggling to hold the group. I finally gave in about the 120-130km mark and let the group go. Riding by myself wasn’t that bad and I wasn’t losing too much time, but at the 165km mark I punctured. My pitstop didn’t work and I ended up getting a spare tubular off of another athlete and made the change. Overall I lost about 10minutes and in hindsight it was a bit of a blessing in disguise. 

 

Getting off the bike I knew my body wasn’t quite right. I felt quite good fatigue wise, but I once again, like Wanaka, had no rhythm and my right hamstring was ‘catching’ on every stride and slowly but surely began to egg away at me.

I saw my coach about the 10km mark and told him the news that this might be my first DNF over this distance. I was out of the race and not doing myself any favours by pushing the hamstring. 

I always prepare for full distance races knowing that I will give everything I have and will never have a ‘plan B.’ This time I had to think about the rest of the year ahead, which made it a little easier to swallow. 

Like I mentioned, had I not punctured I might have been tempted to carry on in the race and fight for a decent place, so again a bit of a blessing in disguise there. 

 

To the mighty Cam Brown – WOW!

Joe Skipper – what a race, solo all day and just went after it with everything he had.

Callum Millward – gets the race of the day in my book. Aggressive all day and took the race to everyone. His race will come.

Meredith Kessler – Dominated again, amazing racing and consistency. Something to aspire to.

 

 

 

 

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